Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Anaesth. 2005 Jun;94(6):821-4. Epub 2005 Mar 11.

Sedative, haemodynamic and respiratory effects of dexmedetomidine in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging examination: preliminary results.

Author information

1
Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Medical Faculty, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey. akoroglu@inonu.edu.tr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We evaluated the sedative, haemodynamic and respiratory effects of dexmedetomidine and compared them with those of midazolam in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures.

METHODS:

Eighty children aged between 1 and 7 yr were randomly allocated to receive sedation with either dexmedetomidine (group D, n=40) or midazolam (group M, n=40). The loading dose of the study drugs was administered for 10 min (dexmedetomidine 1 microg kg(-1) or midazolam 0.2 mg kg(-1)) followed by continuous infusion (dexmedetomidine 0.5 microg kg(-1) h(-1) or midazolam 6 microg kg(-1) min(-1)). Inadequate sedation was defined as difficulty in completing the procedure because of the child's movement during MRI. The children who were inadequately sedated were given a single dose of rescue midazolam and/or propofol intravenously. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and ventilatory frequency (VF) were monitored and recorded during the study.

RESULTS:

The quality of MRI was significantly better and the rate of adequate sedation was higher in group D than in group M (P<0.001). In group D, the requirement for rescue drugs was lower and the onset of sedation time was shorter than in group M (P<0.001). MAP, HR and VF decreased from baseline during sedation in both groups (P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Dexmedetomidine provided adequate sedation in most of the children aged 1-7 yr without haemodynamic or respiratory effects during MRI procedures.

PMID:
15764627
DOI:
10.1093/bja/aei119
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center