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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jun;90(6):3342-9. Epub 2005 Mar 8.

Skeletal site selectivity in the effects of calcium supplementation on areal bone mineral density gain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in prepubertal boys.

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  • 1Service of Bone Diseases, Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, University Hospitals of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland. thierry.chevalley@hcuge.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Calcium supplementation during childhood and adolescence is considered an early means of preventing osteoporosis in adults. Prepuberty is an opportune time for detecting the benefits of calcium in girls.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to assess whether calcium supplementation increases bone mass gain in prepubertal boys in a skeletal site-specific manner.

METHODS:

In a 12-month double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 1-yr follow-up, 235 healthy prepubertal boys aged 7.4 +/- 0.4 yr (mean +/- sd) were randomized to receive two food products providing 850 mg/d calcium (calcium supplement group, n = 116) or an isocaloric placebo (n = 119). Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at radius (two sites), hip (two sites), femoral diaphysis (FDia), and L2-L4 vertebrae.

RESULTS:

At 12 months, aBMD gain was greater at the FDia and at the mean of the five appendicular skeletal sites in the calcium supplement group in both intention-to-treat analysis [76 +/- 32 vs. 64 +/- 33 mg/cm(2).yr; difference, 12.0 (95% confidence interval, CI, 3.6-20.3), P = 0.006; and 33 +/- 16 vs. 28 +/- 16 mg/cm(2).yr; difference, 5.1 (95% CI, 0.9-9.2); P = 0.018, respectively] and active treatment analysis [81 +/- 32 vs. 64 +/- 31 mg/cm(2).yr; difference, 17.2 (95% CI, 7.9-26.5); n = 174, P < 0.001; and 35 +/- 16 vs. 28 +/- 14 mg/cm(2).yr; difference, 7.5 (95% CI, 2.9-12.2); P = 0.002]. There was no beneficial effect of calcium on lumbar spine. The calcium effect was still detectable by ANOVA repeated measures analysis at the FDia (P = 0.004) and at the mean of the five appendicular skeletal sites (P = 0.002) 1 yr after the end of intervention (active treatment analysis). There was no change in bone size.

CONCLUSION:

In prepubertal boys, calcium-enriched foods increased aBMD at several appendicular skeleton sites, but not at the lumbar spine, and this without any bone size change. This effect was maintained 1 yr after treatment discontinuation.

PMID:
15755866
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2004-1455
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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