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J Cyst Fibros. 2005 Mar;4(1):41-8.

Prospective evaluation of emerging bacteria in cystic fibrosis.

Author information

1
CF-Centre Hamburg-Altona and Clinical Research, Hannover, Germany. steinkamp@med-wiss.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bacteria contribute considerably to the progression of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. In this prospective, multi-centre study, we aimed to evaluate the occurrence of emerging bacteria and the physicians' assessments of the clinical importance of these findings.

METHODS:

Twelve CF centres (total number of patients: 1419) reported the detection of any Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia complex, MRSA, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Klebsiella species and Mycobacteria during an observation period of 6 months.

RESULTS:

213 specimens with emerging bacteria were reported from 145 different patients. The proportion of patients with emerging bacteria differed between centres (3-38%, mean: 12.6%) and increased with age. The predominant bacterium was S. maltophilia (n=106 positive specimens), followed by Klebsiellae (n=36), B. cepacia complex (n=31), A. xylosoxidans (n=16), Mycobacteria (n=11), MRSA (n=11), and others (n=2). In many instances the same microorganisms had already been reported earlier, indicating intermittent or chronic colonisation. The clinical status was reported to be stable in 70% of patients, and antibiotic treatment was anticipated for 46% of positive specimens. Comparison of clinical data to age matched controls did not reveal any significant differences with regard to pulmonary and nutritional status prior to detection of emerging bacteria.

CONCLUSION:

These data suggest a high variability between centres regarding the prevalence of emerging bacteria. Most patients maintained a stable clinical condition during the 6-month study period despite being colonised with emerging bacteria.

PMID:
15752680
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcf.2004.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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