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Am J Cardiol. 1992 May 1;69(14):1113-9.

Importance of a patent infarct-related artery for hospital and late survival after direct coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction.

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1
Department of Medicine, Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, North Carolina.

Abstract

The importance of a patent infarct-related artery (IRA) for hospital and late survival was examined in 383 patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with direct coronary angioplasty. At hospital discharge, 317 of 348 patients (91%) had a patent IRA and mean follow-up left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was 58%. Cardiac survival after hospital discharge at 1, 3 and 6 years was 99, 95 and 90%. Patency of the IRA was the most important determinant of hospital mortality: patent versus occluded IRA, 5 vs 39% mortality, p less than 0.001. Follow-up LVEF was the most important determinant of late cardiac mortality: follow-up LVEF greater than or equal to 45 versus less than 45%, 2 versus 24% mortality, p less than 0.001. Patency of the IRA was not a significant predictor of late cardiac mortality in the group as a whole: patent versus occluded IRA, 4.7 versus 6.5% mortality, p = 0.67. In the subgroup of patients with depressed initial LVEF less than 45%, patency was a significant predictor of late cardiac mortality: patent versus occluded IRA, 9.2 versus 40% mortality, p = 0.03. Patients with a patent IRA had better recovery of LV function than patients with an occluded IRA (follow-up LVEF 58.5 versus 47.6%, p less than 0.001). When late cardiac mortality was adjusted for differences in follow-up LVEF, patency was no longer a significant predictor of late mortality. Our results indicate patency of the IRA is the most important determinant of hospital survival, and LV function (measured after recovery) is the most important determinant of late cardiac survival.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
1575178
DOI:
10.1016/0002-9149(92)90922-l
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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