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Antivir Ther. 2005;10(1):83-93.

A randomized controlled trial to enhance antiretroviral therapy adherence in patients with a history of alcohol problems.

Author information

1
Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. jsamet@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effectiveness of an individualized multicomponent intervention to promote adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with a history of alcohol problems.

DESIGN:

We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare the usual medical follow-up with an adherence intervention.

SETTING:

The principal enrolment site was Boston Medical Center, a private, not-for-profit, academic medical institution.

SUBJECTS:

HIV-infected patients with a history of alcohol problems on ART. A total of 151 were enrolled and 141 (93%) were assessed at follow-up.

INTERVENTION:

A nurse, trained in motivational interviewing, completed the following over 3 months in four encounters: addressed alcohol problems; provided a watch with a programmable timer to facilitate pill taking; enhanced perception of treatment efficacy; and delivered individually tailored assistance to facilitate medication use.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prior 30-day adherence > or =95%, prior 3-day adherence of 100%, CD4 cell count, HIV RNA and alcohol consumption, each at both short- and long-term follow-up.

RESULTS:

At follow-up, no significant differences in medication adherence, CD4 cell count, HIV RNA or alcohol consumption were found (all P values >0.25).

CONCLUSIONS:

A multicomponent intervention to enhance adherence among HIV-infected individuals with a history of alcohol problems was not associated with changes in medication adherence, alcohol consumption or markers of HIV disease progression. The failure to change adherence in a group at high risk for poor adherence, despite utilizing an intensive individual-focused patient intervention, supports the idea of addressing medication adherence with supervised medication delivery or markedly simplified dosing regimens.

PMID:
15751766
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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