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Eur J Public Health. 2005 Apr;15(2):185-94. Epub 2005 Feb 22.

Social class, gender and psychosocial predictors for early sexual debut among 16 year olds in Oslo.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Oslo, Norway. a.k.valle@samfunnsmed.uio.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Variations in early sexual debut among 16 year olds were investigated by social level variables, parental occupation, gender, ethnicity, family structure, family functioning, and individual level variables, future aspirations, academic and social self-perception, and depressed moods.

METHODS:

The variations in sexual debut were investigated by examining proportions of 16 year olds reporting their first intercourse before age 16. The data were collected by self-reporting questionnaires administered to in-school-youth, in Oslo. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. Gender interactions with all variables were tested.

RESULTS:

Overall, 25% reported early debut. Independent effect of social class on differences in proportions in early sexual debut were found. Gender interaction with social class, ethnicity and academic self-perception as they associate to proportions having had early sexual debut, were found. For girls the pattern of social class differences was linear and the highest proportions were found among working classes. For boys the pattern was U-shaped and upper managerial and manual working class youth had similar, higher proportions of early debutants. High scores of parental monitoring, future aspirations and academic self-concept and low scores of depressed moods, are protective factors. While high social self-perception is positively associated with early debut for both genders.

CONCLUSION:

Early sexual debut varies according to social class, following gender-specific patterns, among 16 year olds in Oslo. The negative association between early debut and academic self-perception are for boys less influenced by other social and individual level factors, than for girls.

PMID:
15728133
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/cki121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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