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Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):447-52.

Persistence of effects of the Checkpoints program on parental restrictions of teen driving privileges.

Author information

1
Prevention Research Branch, Department of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-7510, USA. mortonb@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We describe intervention effects on parent limits on novice teenage driving.

METHODS:

We recruited parents and their 16-year-old children (n = 469) with learner's permits and randomized them from August 2000 to March 2003. Intervention families received persuasive newsletters related to high-risk teenage driving and a parent-teenager driving agreement; comparison families received standard information on driver safety. We conducted interviews when the adolescents obtained a learner's permit, upon licensure, and at 3, 6, and 12 months postlicensure.

RESULTS:

Intervention parents and teenagers reported stricter limits on teen driving compared with the comparison group at 12 months, with direct effects through 3 months and indirect effects through 12 months postlicensure.

CONCLUSIONS:

A simple behavioral intervention was efficacious in increasing parental restriction of high-risk teen driving conditions among newly licensed drivers.

PMID:
15727975
PMCID:
PMC1449200
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2003.023127
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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