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Urology. 2005 Feb;65(2):270-4.

Impact of vaginal surgery for stress urinary incontinence on female sexual function: is the use of polypropylene mesh detrimental?

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles, Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90024, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate prospectively the impact of a distal urethral polypropylene sling on sexual function using a validated questionnaire. Suburethral slings are currently the most common anti-incontinence surgery performed. Although the use of polypropylene is safe and effective, concern exists that the presence of the material in the vagina may adversely affect sexual function.

METHODS:

A total of 29 patients agreed to participate in this prospective study. The patients were evaluated with the Female Sexual Function Index, a validated, 19-item questionnaire that assesses six domains of sexual function: desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain. The questionnaires were administered at 6-month intervals during the follow-up visits.

RESULTS:

The mean patient age was 52 years (range 38 to 72). The mean duration of follow-up was 19.4 months (range 7 to 37). No statistically significant difference was found in sexual function after placement of a distal urethral polypropylene sling. Of the 29 patients, 14% were not sexually active before or after surgery. No statistically significant difference was found between preoperative and postoperative desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

No change was found in overall sexual function in women undergoing placement of a mid to distal polypropylene urethral sling. Specifically, neither a deleterious effect nor statistically significant improvement was found in sexual desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, or pain compared with the preoperative baseline values.

PMID:
15708036
DOI:
10.1016/j.urology.2004.08.058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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