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Clin Cardiol. 2005 Jan;28(1):47-51.

Associations between C-reactive protein and circulating cell adhesion molecules in patients with unstable angina undergoing coronary intervention and their clinical implication.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kang-Dong Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea. ycdoo97@yahoo.co.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is growing evidence that C-reactive protein (CRP) may have a direct role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

HYPOTHESIS:

The purpose of this study was to assess associations between CRP and adhesion molecules and to determine the prognostic value of adhesion molecules as a predictor of cardiac events in patients with unstable angina.

METHODS:

Fifty-five consecutive patients (33 males, mean age 61 years) with unstable angina (Braunwald class IIb or IIIb) undergoing coronary stenting were included in this study.

RESULTS:

The test for a trend toward increasing intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 concentrations by the 75th percentile of CRP levels at 72 h after coronary stenting was significant (p = 0.03). At 72 h after coronary stenting, CRP levels were the only determinants of ICAM-1 concentrations by multiple linear regression analysis. An elevated level of CRP (>5.4 mg/l) (odds ratio [OR] 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-3.7, p < 0.05) and ICAM-1 (>321 ng/ml) (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, p < 0.05) at 72 h after coronary stenting is an independent risk factor for an adverse cardiac event.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that in patients with unstable angina undergoing coronary stenting, the measurements of inflammatory parameters, especially CRP and ICAM-1, may be useful for identifying those at higher risk of a cardiac event, and CRP may play a direct role in promoting the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis by inducing significant expression of ICAM-1.

PMID:
15704532
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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