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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2005 Feb 1;226(3):393-400.

Evaluation of the association between initial proteinuria and morbidity rate or death in dogs with naturally occurring chronic renal failure.

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1
Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UP:C) > or = 1.0 at initial diagnosis of chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with greater risk of development of uremic crises, death, and progression of renal failure in dogs.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

ANIMALS:

45 dogs with CRF PROCEDURE: Dogs were prospectively assigned to 2 groups on the basis of initial UP:C < 1.0 or 2 > or = 1.0. The association between magnitude of proteinuria and development of uremic crises and death was determined before and after dogs with initial UP:C > or =1.0 were assigned to 3 subgroups and compared with dogs with initial UP:C < 1.0. Changes in reciprocal serum creatinine concentration were used to estimate decrease in renal function.

RESULTS:

Initially, dogs had similar clinical characteristics with the exception of systolic blood pressure and UP:C. Relative risks of development of uremic crises and death were approximately 3 times higher in dogs with UP:C > or =1.0, compared with dogs with UP:C < 1.0. Relative risk of adverse outcome was approximately 1.5 times higher for every 1-unit increment in UP:C. The decrease in renal function was of greater magnitude in dogs with UP:C > or =1.0, compared with dogs with UP:C < 1.0.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Initial UP:C > or =1.0 in dogs with CRF was associated with greater risk of development of uremic crises and death, compared with dogs with UP:C < 1.0. Initial determinations of UP:C in dogs with naturally occurring CRF may be of value in refining prognoses.

PMID:
15702689
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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