Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Med Res Opin. 2004 Dec;20(12):2015-9.

Efficacy of topical ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% for control of pain or discomfort associated with cataract surgery.

Author information

1
Cornea Research Foundation of America, and the Price Vision Group, Indianapolis, IN, USA. fprice@pricevisiongroup.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy of ketorolac 0.4% ophthalmic solution for control of pain and discomfort associated with cataract surgery.

METHODS:

This was a single-center, double-masked, randomized, fellow-eye placebo-controlled clinical study of 25 patients (mean age 72 years; 76% female) requiring bilateral cataract surgery. Patients received either ketorolac tromethamine 0.4% ophthalmic solution (Acular LS *) or placebo, 1 drop QID for 3 days prior to and 1 day following phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation on their first eye, and the other treatment for surgery on the second, fellow eye 1 week-4 weeks later. The physician rated patient cooperation and ocular pain or discomfort during surgery, and patients rated ocular pain or discomfort immediately and 24 h after surgery.

RESULTS:

Patients reported significantly less ocular pain during the 24 h following surgery when treated with ketorolac 0.4% than with placebo (p = 0.02). Ocular pain was reported for only a single ketorolac 0.4%-treated eye (4%) during that period, compared with 39% of placebo-treated eyes (p = 0.004). No significant differences between eyes treated with ketorolac 0.4% and placebo were observed in patient cooperation, and ocular pain or discomfort during or immediately after surgery. No adverse events occurred during the study.

LIMITATIONS:

Evaluation of pain is subjective, and the severity of pain experienced in the control, vehicle-treated eyes was low.

CONCLUSIONS:

The reduction in pain associated with cataract surgery afforded by ophthalmic ketorolac 0.4%, together with its favorable safety profile, make it an important tool to help surgeons meet the high expectations of today's cataract and refractive surgery patients.

PMID:
15701218
DOI:
10.1185/030079904X16759
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis
    Loading ...
    Support Center