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Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Feb;81(2):361-6.

Influence of changes in sedentary behavior on energy and macronutrient intake in youth.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214-3000, USA. lhenet@acsu.buffalo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Changes in sedentary behavior may be related to changes in energy intake.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate how experimental changes in the amount of sedentary behaviors influence energy intake.

DESIGN:

Sixteen nonoverweight 12-16-y-old youth were studied in a within-subject crossover design with three 3-wk phases: baseline, increasing targeted sedentary behaviors by 25-50% (increase phase), and decreasing targeted sedentary behaviors by 25-50% (decrease phase). Repeated 24-h recalls were used to assess energy and macronutrient intakes during targeted sedentary behaviors. Accelerometers were used to assess activity levels.

RESULTS:

Targeted sedentary behaviors increased by 81.5 min/d (45.8%) and decreased by 109.8 min/d (-61.2%) from baseline (both: P<0.01). Girls increased sedentary behaviors significantly more than did boys (107.3 and 55.8 min/d, respectively; P<0.01) in the increase phase. Energy intake decreased (-463.0 kcal/d; P<0.01) when sedentary behaviors decreased: the decrease in fat intake was -295.2 kcal/d (P<0.01). No significant changes in energy intake were observed when sedentary behaviors were increased. Youth also increased their activity by 102.4 activity counts min-1d-1 (estimated at 113.1 kcal) when sedentary behaviors were decreased (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Decreasing sedentary behaviors can decrease energy intake in nonoverweight adolescent youth and should be considered an important component of interventions to prevent obesity and to regulate body weight.

PMID:
15699222
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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