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J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jan;136(1):71-5.

Dental erosion due to wine consumption.

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1
Salivary Gland Center, Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. LM7@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dental erosions can result from numerous causes, but extrinsic dietary factors are the most common. Because of wine's acidity, it may have a deleterious effect on teeth. Its use must be considered during an evaluation of erosive dental changes.

CASE DESCRIPTION:

The author examined a 56-year-old woman because her referring dentist had noted extensive erosive loss of tooth structure, mainly enamel. The author eliminated the usual causes of dental erosion. It was only after a detailed history was obtained and dietary investigation was undertaken that the author determined that the amount, manner and timing of the patient's wine drinking was the cause of the problem.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Dentists should be aware that wine could be a cause of dental erosion. Early recognition negates progressive dental damage with its need for extensive dental restoration. Furthermore, because patients with wine-incited dental erosions consume large volumes of wine with its significant alcohol content, medical referral by the dentist for a liver assessment is indicated.

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PMID:
15693499
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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