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J Pediatr. 2005 Feb;146(2):253-7.

Deformational brachycephaly in supine-sleeping infants.

Author information

1
Medical Genetics Institute, Ahmanson Department of Pediatrics, Steven Spielberg Pediatric Research Center, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Medical dictionaries and anthropologic sources define brachycephaly as a cranial index (CI = width divided by length x 100%) greater than 81%. We examine the impact of supine sleeping on CI and compare orthotic treatment with repositioning.

STUDY DESIGN:

We compared the effect of repositioning versus helmet therapy on CI in 193 infants referred for abnormal head shape.

RESULTS:

Eighty percent of the infants had a pretreatment CI > 81%. Their initial mean CI at mean age 5.3 months was 89%, and after treatment, their mean CI was 87% (+/-2 SE = 0.9%) at mean age 9.0 months. For 92 infants with an initial CI at or above 90%, their initial mean CI of 96.1% was reduced to a mean of 91.9%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Post-treatment CI was 86% to 88%, CI in neonates delivered by cesarean section was 80%, and CI in supine-sleeping Asian children was 85% to 91%, versus 78% to 83% for prone-sleeping American children. Repositioning was less effective than cranial orthotic therapy in correcting severe brachycephaly. We recommend varying the head position when putting infants to sleep.

PMID:
15689919
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2004.10.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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