Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep. 2004 Dec 15;27(8):1507-11.

C-reactive protein and sleep-disordered breathing.

Author information

1
Sleep Disorders Clinic, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. cguil@stanford.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

Over a 2-month period, to evaluate serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in new patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS), and absence of important comorbidity, as well as in normal controls.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis.

SETTING:

Sleep disorders clinic.

PATIENTS:

239 successively monitored subjects: 156 subjects were diagnosed with OSAS, 39 with UARS, and 54 controls.

INTERVENTIONS:

none.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Clinical information (neurologic, general medical, and otolaryngology examination), body mass index, neck circumference, hip-waist ratio, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, 3 fatigue scales, Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, serum CRP, and polysomnography were collected. Analysis of variance indicated a significant difference between the groups for diastolic blood pressure, respiratory disturbance index, lowest SaO2, and body mass index. The mean serum CRP level was normal in all 3 groups. Only 15 (14 OSAS and 1 UARS) out of 239 subjects had high serum CRP values. CRP levels were significantly correlated with body mass index, esophageal pressures, hip-waist ratio, neck circumference, and blood pressure. Only body mass index was significantly associated with high CRP values; multiple regression showed: adjusted R2 = 0.115, beta = 0.345, P <.001. When men and women were considered separately, body mass index was again significantly associated with high CRP levels.

CONCLUSION:

Obesity is a risk factor for high serum CRP levels in patients with sleep-disordered breathing, as in the general population.

PMID:
15683141
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/27.8.1507
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center