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J Clin Gastroenterol. 2005 Feb;39(2):168-71.

Mycophenolate mofetil for the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis in patients with an incomplete response to ursodeoxycholic acid.

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1
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. talwalkar.jayant@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Despite evidence for therapeutic efficacy with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), only 30-50% of patients achieve complete biochemical remission within 1 year of therapy. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive medication that inhibits T and B lymphocyte proliferation. The aim of this investigation was to determine the safety and estimated efficacy of MMF in patients with PBC.

METHODS:

Twenty-five patients with incomplete responses to UDCA (defined as persistent elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase > or =2 times the upper limit of normal) received MMF 1 g daily to a maximum of 3 g daily with UDCA (13-15 mg/kg per day) for 1 year. Liver biochemistries were determined at 3-month intervals with Mayo Risk Score calculated at baseline and end of therapy.

RESULTS:

Nineteen (76%) patients completed 1 year of therapy. Despite improvements in serum alkaline phosphatase (920 +/- 308 vs. 709 +/- 242 IU/L, P = 0.001) and AST (65 +/- 31 vs. 51 +/- 19 IU/L, P = 0.007) levels, these findings were clinically insignificant. Exploratory analysis revealed a strong correlation between advanced PBC defined by higher Mayo Risk Score and reduction in serum alkaline phosphatase levels (r = -0.74, P = 0.006). Six patients (24%) did not complete therapy; adverse drug events were responsible for study withdrawal in 3 individuals. Adverse reactions that resolved spontaneously or by dose reduction occurred in 13 patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

MMF is not associated with important clinical benefits in PBC based on the results of this pilot investigation.

PMID:
15681915
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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