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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;59(3):311-7.

A 7-week reduction in salt intake does not contribute to markers of bone metabolism in young healthy subjects.

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  • 1Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Division of Nutrition, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sodium intake increases urinary calcium excretion and may thus lead to negative calcium balance and bone loss.

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesised that reducing sodium intake would reduce urinary calcium excretion and have a beneficial influence in bone metabolism.

DESIGN:

A total of 29 subjects, 14 males and 15 females, were divided into two study groups. One group (low-sodium group (LS)) reduced sodium intake for 7 weeks by substituting low-salt alternatives for the most important dietary sources of sodium. The other group, serving as a control group (C), was given the same food items in the form of normally salted alternatives. Fasting serum samples as well as 24-h urine samples were obtained in the beginning and at the end of the study. Urinary sodium, urinary calcium, urinary creatinine, serum calcium, serum phosphate, serum creatinine, serum parathyroid hormone (s-PTH), serum C-terminal telopeptides of Type-I collagen and serum bone alkaline phosphatase (s-B-ALP) were analysed.

RESULTS:

The LS group showed a significant decline (P = 0.001) in urinary sodium/creatinine ratio without a significant effect on urinary calcium/creatinine ratio. In the LS group, s-PTH increased (P = 0.03). The C group showed an increase in s-PTH (P = 0.05) and in s-B-ALP, but no differences were observed between the study groups in the changes of serum markers of calcium and bone metabolism.

CONCLUSIONS:

We have shown that reducing the sodium intake of young, healthy people with adequate calcium intake over a 7-week period does not affect the markers of bone metabolism.

PMID:
15674316
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602074
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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