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J Med Food. 2004 Winter;7(4):498-501.

Prevention of garlic-induced hemolytic anemia using some tropical green leafy vegetables.

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  • 1Biochemistry Department, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. goboh2001@yahoo.com

Abstract

Garlic (Allium sativum) is popularly consumed in Nigeria because of its health benefit in treatment and management of several disease conditions. However, excessive intake of garlic may cause hemolytic anemia. This project sought to investigate the ability of some commonly consumed tropical green leafy vegetables-namely, Amaranthus cruentus, Baselia alba, Solanum macrocarpon, Ocimum gratissimum, and Corchorus olitorius-to prevent garlic-induced hemolytic anemia. Wister strain albino rats were fed diet containing 4% garlic with or without 40% vegetable supplement. The study showed that there was a decrease in daily feed intake (6.7-7.2 g/rat/day), daily weight gain (0.7-1.5 g/rat/day), and digestibility (70.4-91.5%) of rats fed diet with garlic (4%), with or without vegetable (40%) supplement, compared with those rats fed the basal diet without garlic (4%) and vegetable (40%) supplement (digestibility, 95.5%; daily feed intake, 7.5 g/rat/day; and daily weight gain, 2.0 g/rat/day). However, there was a significant decrease (P < .05) in the packed cell volume (PCV) (31.0%), hemoglobin (Hb) (10.2 g/dL), red blood cells (RBCs) (4.3 x 10(6)/microL), and white blood cells (WBCs) (3.5 x 10(6)/microL) of rats fed diet with garlic (4%) but without vegetable compared with those rats fed diet without garlic (4%) and vegetable (40%) supplements (PCV, 38.2%; Hb, 13.0 g/dL; RBCs, 5.5 x 10(6)/microL; and WBCs, 4.0 x 10(6)/microL). Conversely, there was a significant increase in the PCV (33.5-35.6%), Hb (12.0-12.5 g/dL), and RBCs (4.9-5.3 x 10(6)/microL) of rats fed diet with garlic (4%) and vegetable (40%) supplement compared with rats fed diet with 4% garlic supplement (except S. macrocarpon and C. olitorius). Furthermore, there was a significant decrease (P < .05) in mean corpuscular volume (69.2-72.0 fL) of rats fed the basal and those fed diet with garlic and vegetable (except C. olitorus and S. macrocarpon) supplement compared with the rats fed diet with garlic but without vegetable supplement (74.5 fL). This therefore implies that garlic could induce hemolytic anemia in rats. However, such anemia could be prevented by some tropical green leafy vegetables such as A. cruentus, B. alba, and O. gratissimum.

PMID:
15671698
DOI:
10.1089/jmf.2004.7.498
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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