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J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Feb;24(1):65-75.

Diet quality in young children is influenced by beverage consumption.

Author information

  • 1Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, University of Iowa College of Dentistry, N335 Dental Science Building, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. teresa-marshall@uiowa.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Replacement of milk with sugar-containing beverages could affect calcium intake and overall diet quality.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe dairy food, 100% juice and added sugar beverage intakes, contributions of dairy foods to diet quality, and effects of beverages on diet quality in young children.

METHODS:

We surveyed participants in the Iowa Fluoride Study (n = 645) at ages 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years and calculated intakes for 1-5 years (i.e. weighted averages). Nutrient, dairy food and beverage intakes were obtained from 3-day diaries; nutrient adequacy ratios were calculated as the nutrient intake to Recommended Dietary Allowance/Adequate Intake ratio; and dairy-dependent percentages were calculated as fractions of total diet nutrient adequacy ratios (truncated at 1) not met by non-dairy foods.

RESULTS:

Milk intakes were inversely associated with intakes of juice drinks (2, 4, 5 and 1-5 years), soda pop (2, 3, 4, 5 and 1-5 years) and added sugar beverages (2, 3, 4, 5 and 1-5 years). Dairy dependent fractions of 1-5 year nutrient adequacy ratios were 68% for calcium and 61% for vitamin D. Higher 1-5 year calcium adequacy was predicted by higher energy, higher other dairy and lower added sugar beverage intakes while higher vitamin D adequacy was predicted by higher energy and higher other dairy intakes. Overall diet quality was predicted by higher energy, higher other dairy, lower 100% juice and lower added sugar beverage intakes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dairy foods remain an important source of calcium and vitamin D, while added sugar beverages and, to a lesser extent, 100% juice decrease diet quality of young children.

PMID:
15670987
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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