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Synapse. 2005 Mar 15;55(4):242-51.

Modulation of dopamine release by striatal 5-HT2C receptors.

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1
Department of Neuroscience, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, USA.

Abstract

Previous work has demonstrated that dopamine (DA) transmission is regulated by serotonin-2C (5-HT2C) receptors but the site(s) in the brain where these receptors are localized is not known. The present work utilized in vivo microdialysis to investigate the modulation of DA release by 5-HT2C receptors localized in the nerve terminal regions of the mesocortical and nigrostriatal DA pathways. Microdialysis probes implanted in the striatum or the prefrontal cortex (PFC) measured dialysate DA concentrations, while the selective 5-HT2B/2C inverse agonist SB 206553 was given locally by reverse dialysis into these terminal regions. Additionally, the effects of the 5-HT2C agonist mCPP on striatal DA were measured. Local administration of SB 206553 (0.1-100 microM) into the striatum increased DA efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. Systemic administration of mCPP (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) decreased striatal DA and attenuated the SB 206553-induced increase. In contrast, infusion of SB 206553 (0.1-500 microM) by reverse dialysis into the PFC had no significant effect on basal DA efflux in this region. Additionally, high concentrations of SB 206553 had no effect on high potassium (K(+))-stimulated DA release in the PFC. These data contribute to a body of evidence indicating that 5-HT2C receptors inhibit nigrostriatal dopaminergic transmission. In addition, the results suggest that the nigrostriatal system is regulated by 5-HT2C receptors localized in the dorsal striatum. Elucidating the mechanisms by which serotonin (5-HT) modulates striatal and prefrontocortical DA concentrations may lead to improvements in the treatment of diverse syndromes such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, anxiety, drug abuse, and/or depression.

PMID:
15668911
DOI:
10.1002/syn.20109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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