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Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Feb 1;40(3):358-65. Epub 2005 Jan 6.

Treatment with clarithromycin prior to coronary artery bypass graft surgery does not prevent subsequent cardiac events.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Microbiology, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands. hf.berg@tiscali.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recently, it has been suggested that Chlamydia pneumoniae possibly plays a possible role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We investigated whether treatment with clarithromycin prior to coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery would prevent subsequent cardiovascular events and mortality.

METHODS:

Patients who were scheduled for CABG surgery were randomly assigned to receive either clarithromycin or placebo until the day of surgery in a double-blind trial. During the 2 years of follow-up, mortality and cardiovascular events were assessed.

RESULTS:

Follow-up at 2 years was achieved for 473 patients. The mean duration of treatment was 16 days. Patient characteristics at baseline were well balanced between the 2 treatment groups. Mortality was equal in the 2 groups: 10 (4.2%) of 238 patients in the clarithromycin group and 9 (3.8%) of 235 patients in the placebo group (relative risk, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.42-2.89; P=1.0). Also, there were no significant differences in the proportion of patients who experienced cardiovascular events during the follow-up period: 20 (8.4%) of 238 patients in the clarithromycin group and 19 (8.1%) of 235 patients in the placebo group (relative risk, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.55-1.98; P=1.0). The overall rate of such events was 58 (12.3%) of 473 patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment with clarithromycin in patients scheduled for CABG surgery did not reduce the subsequent occurrence of cardiovascular events or mortality during a 2-year follow-up period.

PMID:
15668857
DOI:
10.1086/427111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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