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J Biol Chem. 2005 Apr 15;280(15):15238-46. Epub 2005 Jan 24.

Lactisole interacts with the transmembrane domains of human T1R3 to inhibit sweet taste.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.

Abstract

The detection of sweet-tasting compounds is mediated in large part by a heterodimeric receptor comprised of T1R2+T1R3. Lactisole, a broad-acting sweet antagonist, suppresses the sweet taste of sugars, protein sweeteners, and artificial sweeteners. Lactisole's inhibitory effect is specific to humans and other primates; lactisole does not affect responses to sweet compounds in rodents. By heterologously expressing interspecies combinations of T1R2+T1R3, we have determined that the target for lactisole's action is human T1R3. From studies with mouse/human chimeras of T1R3, we determined that the molecular basis for sensitivity to lactisole depends on only a few residues within the transmembrane region of human T1R3. Alanine substitution of residues in the transmembrane region of human T1R3 revealed 4 key residues required for sensitivity to lactisole. In our model of T1R3's seven transmembrane helices, lactisole is predicted to dock to a binding pocket within the transmembrane region that includes these 4 key residues.

PMID:
15668251
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M414287200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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