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Int J Urol. 2005 Jan;12(1):7-11.

Therapeutic effects of long-term administration of an oral adsorbent in patients with chronic renal failure: two-year study.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Aomori, Japan. nobu.ta@abelia.ocn.ne.jp

Erratum in

  • Int J Urol. 2006 Jan;13(1):98.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Kremezin is an oral adsorbent that attenuates the progression of chronic renal failure by removing uremic toxins and their precursors from the gastrointestinal tract. Previously two clinical studies based on reciprocal serum creatinine levels (1/Scr) have confirmed the efficacy of Kremezin (Kureha Chemical, Tokyo, Japan) in undialyzed patients who had been followed up for 6 months or 1 year. This is the first report to evaluate the therapeutic effects of long-term administration (2 years.) of Kremezin in undialyzed patients.

METHODS:

Kremezin was given to 48 enrolled undialyzed patients with a median Scr level of 4.3 mg/dL. Rates of decline of 1/Scr, as well as the time for Scr level to reach 10 mg/dL, the critical value requiring dialysis, were compared before and after administration of Kremezin.

RESULTS:

During the 2-year therapeutic period, 1/Scr gradients were significantly attenuated (P = 0.0083), and the estimated time to dialysis was prolonged from 16.3 +/- 16.3 months to 29.8 +/- 24.1 months (P = 0.002). When the patients were divided into two groups, based on of systolic blood pressure (SBP), defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, a significantly smaller number of patients in the low blood pressure group (SBP < 160 mmHg) were introduced to dialysis (P = 0.0005), and the estimated time to dialysis was significantly extended in the low blood pressure group (P = 0.0125).

CONCLUSION:

In addition to the control of blood pressure in undialyzed patients, Kremezin has additive salutary effects to halt the progressive loss of renal function, resulting in the delay of dialysis.

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