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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005 Jan;131(1):52-7.

Child behavior and quality of life in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess behavior and quality of life in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy compared with control children.

DESIGN:

Prospective controlled study.

SETTING:

Hospital-based pediatric otolaryngology practice.

PARTICIPANTS:

Forty-two children (25 boys and 17 girls; mean [SD] age, 5.8 [2.5] years) with OSA confirmed by positive findings on polysomnography undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and 41 control children (29 boys and 12 girls; mean [SD] age, 7.3 [3.8] years) with no history of snoring undergoing unrelated elective surgery.

INTERVENTIONS:

Parents completed the standardized Child Behavior Checklist and a validated pediatric OSA quality-of-life survey before and 3 months after surgery.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Child Behavior Checklist T scores and score classifications and quality-of-life survey mean scores.

RESULTS:

Change in mean total problem T score was significantly greater in the OSA group (from 51.6 at baseline to 48.3 at follow-up) than in controls (from 45.5 at baseline to 46.7 at follow-up) (P = .03). The improvement in total T score classification (normal vs borderline or abnormal) was significant for children with OSA compared with control children (P = .009). Children with OSA had significant improvements in the quality-of-life survey mean total score and all individual domain scores compared with controls (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Behavioral and emotional difficulties are found in children with documented OSA compared with control children, and they improve after treatment. Large improvements in disease-specific quality of life are also found. Scores on a standardized measure of behavior assessment demonstrated significant correlation with scores on a validated quality-of-life instrument.

PMID:
15655186
DOI:
10.1001/archotol.131.1.52
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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