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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Jan 18;45(2):272-7.

Independent and incremental prognostic value of early mitral annulus velocity in patients with impaired left ventricular systolic function.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to investigate the incremental prognostic value of non-invasive measures of early myocardial relaxation and left ventricular diastolic pressure (LVDP) in patients with impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic function.

BACKGROUND:

The early diastolic mitral annulus velocity (Em) reflects myocardial relaxation, and the combined ratio of the early transmitral flow velocity (E) to Em (E/Em) >15 correlates well with elevated mean LVDP. It is unknown if these new indexes will predict poorer survival in patients with LV systolic dysfunction.

METHODS:

Echocardiograms were prospectively obtained in 182 patients with impaired LV systolic function, defined as an LV ejection fraction <0.50. The end point was cardiac mortality. The majority of this patient sample (80%) has been reported on in a previous publication.

RESULTS:

After a median 48 months' follow-up, Em emerged as an independent predictor of survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.82). An Em <3 cm/s was associated with a significantly excess mortality (log-rank statistic 9.36, p = 0.002), and this measurement added incremental prognostic value to standard indexes of systolic or diastolic function, including a deceleration time <140 ms and an E/Em >15 (p = 0.038).

CONCLUSIONS:

Early diastolic mitral annulus velocity is a powerful predictor of cardiac mortality in patients with LV systolic impairment; Em <3 cm/s emerged as the best prognosticator in long-term follow-up, incremental to other clinical or echocardiographic variables, including the ratio E/Em.

PMID:
15653027
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2004.09.059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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