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Blood. 2005 Apr 15;105(8):3051-7. Epub 2005 Jan 4.

Successful adoptive transfer and in vivo expansion of human haploidentical NK cells in patients with cancer.

Author information

1
Division Medical and Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Minnesota Cancer Center, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. mille011@umn.edu

Abstract

We previously demonstrated that autologous natural killer (NK)-cell therapy after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is safe but does not provide an antitumor effect. We hypothesize that this is due to a lack of NK-cell inhibitory receptor mismatching with autologous tumor cells, which may be overcome by allogeneic NK-cell infusions. Here, we test haploidentical, related-donor NK-cell infusions in a nontransplantation setting to determine safety and in vivo NK-cell expansion. Two lower intensity outpatient immune suppressive regimens were tested: (1) low-dose cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone and (2) fludarabine. A higher intensity inpatient regimen of high-dose cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (Hi-Cy/Flu) was tested in patients with poor-prognosis acute myeloid leukemia (AML). All patients received subcutaneous interleukin 2 (IL-2) after infusions. Patients who received lower intensity regimens showed transient persistence but no in vivo expansion of donor cells. In contrast, infusions after the more intense Hi-Cy/Flu resulted in a marked rise in endogenous IL-15, expansion of donor NK cells, and induction of complete hematologic remission in 5 of 19 poor-prognosis patients with AML. These findings suggest that haploidentical NK cells can persist and expand in vivo and may have a role in the treatment of selected malignancies used alone or as an adjunct to HCT.

PMID:
15632206
DOI:
10.1182/blood-2004-07-2974
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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