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Soc Sci Med. 2005 Mar;60(6):1359-70.

Self-rated health within the Canadian immigrant population: risk and the healthy immigrant effect.

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  • 1School of Geography and Geology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1, Canada. newbold@mcmaster.ca

Abstract

Set within the determinants of health framework and drawing upon Statistics Canada's longitudinal National Population Health Survey, this paper explores the self-assessed health of Canada's immigrant population. Using both descriptive and multivariate techniques, including logistic regression and survival analysis, the intent is to identify differences in self-assessed health between the immigrant and native-born populations, the factors that contribute to immigrant self-assessed health, and the factors associated with declining self-assessed health status. In each case, the key questions are whether differences in health status exist between the native- and foreign-born. Results indicate mixed support for the Healthy Immigrant Effect, with the native- and foreign-born neither more nor less likely to rank their health as fair or poor. However, results from the proportional hazards model indicated that the native-born were at lower risk to transition to poor health.

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