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Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Dec 15;10(24):8531-7.

Prognostic relevance of increased angiogenesis in osteosarcoma.

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1
Department of Medicine/Hematology and Oncology, University Children's Hospital, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this work was to evaluate the prognostic relevance of microvessel density (MVD) for response to chemotherapy and long-term outcome in osteosarcoma.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

Pretherapeutic tumor biopsies of 60 patients with high-grade central osteosarcoma, who were treated according to multimodal neoadjuvant protocols of the German-Austrian-Swiss Cooperative Osteosarcoma Study Group, were evaluated for intratumoral MVD. MVD was correlated with demographic and tumor-related variables, response, and survival.

RESULTS:

The median intratumoral MVD was 52 microvessels per 0.26-mm2 field area (interquartile range, 31-77 microvessels per 0.26-mm2 field area). At a median follow-up period of 3.5 years, patients with a high (>median) MVD had significantly higher 5- and 10-year overall survival rates (84%) than patients with low (< or =median) MVD (49%; P = 0.0029). Furthermore, increased relapse-free survival for patients with high MVD (P = 0.0064) was observed. In a subgroup analysis of 44 patients with primary high-grade central osteosarcoma of the extremities without primary metastases and good surgical remission, high MVD was associated with 5- and 10-year overall survival rates of 91% compared with 58% for low MVD (P = 0.034). Cox regression analysis revealed that MVD was an independent prognostic factor for survival. A good response to chemotherapy (histologic grading scale of Salzer-Kuntschik) correlated significantly with a high MVD (P = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased angiogenesis is a prognostic indicator for higher survival and response rates to chemotherapy in patients with osteosarcoma. Thus, measurement of MVD might be useful in decisions selecting patients for future neoadjuvant treatment.

PMID:
15623635
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-04-0969
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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