Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cryobiology. 2004 Dec;49(3):286-90.

Developmental capacity of vitrified immature porcine oocytes following ICSI: effects of cytochalasin B and cryoprotectants.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, 080-8555, Japan.

Abstract

In the present study, effects of concentration and pretreatment time of cytochalasin B (CB), and of two types of cryoprotectant solutions on the nuclear maturation of vitrified-warmed porcine oocytes were examined. Also, the developmental capacity of vitrified immature porcine oocytes following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was investigated. The nuclear maturation rate (46.8%) of the vitrified-warmed oocytes treated with 7.5 microg/mL CB for 30 min was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those (13.9-39.2%) of the vitrified-warmed oocytes treated with 0, 2.5, or 5.0 microg/mL CB for 10 or 30 min. Additionally, the nuclear maturation rate of oocytes treated with CB and vitrified in ethylene glycol (EG) (37.1%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of EG + dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) (23.9%). However, no significant differences were observed in the cleavage and blastocyst development rates among the control (45.2 and 20.0%, respectively), the EG group (37.8 and 13.5%, respectively) and the EG + Me(2)SO group (39.3 and 14.3%, respectively). These results demonstrated that: (1) pretreatment with 7.5 microg/mL CB was beneficial for the vitrification of immature porcine oocytes; (2) the combination of EG and Me(2)SO as a cryoprotectant was not advantageous for in vitro maturation (IVM) of vitrified immature porcine oocytes; and (3) vitrified-warmed porcine oocytes matured after IVM, developed to the blastocyst stage without distinct differences compared to fresh oocytes following ICSI.

PMID:
15615614
DOI:
10.1016/j.cryobiol.2004.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center