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J Appl Microbiol. 2005;98(1):56-63.

Lyophilized preparations of bacteriocinogenic Lactobacillus curvatus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis as potential protective adjuncts to control Listeria monocytogenes in dry-fermented sausages.

Author information

1
D├ępartement des Sciences Alimentaires et Nutritionnelles, Institut Agronomique et Veterinaire Hasssan II, Rabat, Morocco. n.benkerroum@iav.ac.ma

Abstract

AIM:

Study of the effectiveness of in situ bacteriocin production by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to control Listeria monocytogenes in dry-fermented sausages.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Two bacteriocin-producing strains: Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LMG21206 and Lactobacillus curvatus LBPE were grown in a pilot scale fermentor and lyophilized to be directly used in dry sausage fermentation. A commercial starter culture (Bel'meat SL-25) not inhibitory to L. monocytogenes (Bac- starter) was mixed (1 : 1) with each of the two lyophilized bacteriocin-producing strains to obtain starters active against the pathogen (Bac+ starter). Anti-Listeria effectiveness of the Bac+ starters was studied in dry-fermented sausages. The meat batter was experimentally contaminated with a mixture of four different strains of L. monocytogenes (10(2)-10(3) CFU g(-1)). The results showed that L. monocytogenes did not grow in any of the contaminated batches, but no significant decrease (P > 0.05) was observed either in the positive control (no added starter culture) or in samples fermented with the Bac- starter culture during the fermentation period and up to 15 days of drying. When the Bac+ starter contained Lb. curvatus LBPE, cell counts of L. monocytogenes decreased to below the detectable limit (<10 CFU g(-1)) after 4 h of fermentation and no survivors could be recovered by enrichment beyond day 8 of drying. When the Bac+ starter culture containing Lc. lactis LMG21206 was used, a decrease in Listeria counts to below the detectable limit was achieved after 15 days of drying.

CONCLUSIONS:

The bacteriocin-producing strains studied may be used as adjunct cultures for sausage fermentations to control the occurrence and survival of L. monocytogenes.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY:

Addition of the Bac+ strains, especially the Lb. curvatus strain would provide an additional hurdle to enhance the control of L. monocytogenes in fermented meat products.

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