Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Gen Intern Med. 2004 Dec;19(12):1192-9.

Cardiac risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus and major depression.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, 98195-6560, USA. wkaton@u.washington.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The prevalence of major depression is approximately 2-fold higher in patients with diabetes mellitus compared to medical controls. We explored the association of major depression with 8 cardiac risk factors in diabetic patients with and without evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

DESIGN:

A mail survey questionnaire was administered to a population-based sample of 4,225 patients with diabetes to obtain data on depression status, diabetes self-care (diet, exercise, and smoking), diabetes history, and demographics. On the basis of automated data we measured diabetes complications, glycosylated hemoglobin, medical comorbidity, low-density lipid levels, triglyceride levels, diagnosis of hypertension, and evidence of microalbuminuria. Separate analyses were conducted for subgroups according to the presence or absence of CVD.

SETTING:

Nine primary care clinics of a nonprofit health maintenance organization.

MAIN RESULTS:

Patients with major depression and diabetes were 1.5- to 2-fold more likely to have 3 or more cardiovascular risk factors as patients with diabetes without depression (62.5% vs 38.4% in those without CVD, and 61.3% vs 45% in those with CVD). Patients with diabetes without CVD who met criteria for major depression were significantly more likely to be smokers, to have a body mass index (BMI) > or = 30 kg/m2, to lead a more sedentary lifestyle, and to have HbA1c levels of >8.0% compared to nondepressed patients with diabetes without heart disease. Patients with major depression, diabetes, and evidence of heart disease were significantly more likely to have a BMI > or = 30 kg/m2, a more sedentary lifestyle, and triglyceride levels > 400 mg/dl than nondepressed diabetic patients with evidence of heart disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with major depression and diabetes with or without evidence of heart disease have a higher number of CVD risk factors. Interventions aimed at decreasing these risk factors may need to address treatment for major depression in order to be effective.

PMID:
15610329
PMCID:
PMC1492592
DOI:
10.1111/j.1525-1497.2004.30405.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center