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Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 16;124(24):3194-6.

[Bite wound infections].

[Article in Norwegian]

Author information

1
Infeksjonsmedisinsk seksjon, Akershus universitetssykehus, 1474 Nordbyhagen. sheraz.yaqub@basalmed.uio.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The lifetime risk of experiencing a bite wound, human or animal, is approximately 50%, and bite wounds account for approximately 1% of all visits to emergency departments. The majority of bite wounds are inflicted by dogs and cats.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A review of the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of bite wound infections is presented.

RESULTS:

The most common pathogens associated with bite wounds are Streptococcus species, Staphylococcus species, Pasteurella multocida, Capnocytophaga canimorsus and anaerobic bacteria. Sporadically other pathogens are isolated from bite wounds. Human bites differ from animal bites by higher prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Eikenella corrodens.

INTERPRETATION:

It is important to be aware of the possibility of complicating infections following bite wounds, particularly after cat bites. Phenoxymethyl penicillin should be the drug of choice in treatment of infections associated with cat and dog bites. However, in case of slow recovery or no improvement, simultaneous lymphadenopathy or pneumonia, S. aureus or Francisella tularensis should be suspected; ciprofloxacin is recommended. For human bite infections the recommend treatment is phenoxymethyl penicillin in combination with penicillinase-stable penicillin.

PMID:
15608763
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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