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Clin Exp Immunol. 2005 Jan;139(1):112-9.

Acquired but reversible loss of erythrocyte complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) and its longitudinal alteration in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

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1
Research Centre of Biological Therapy, Beijing Institute of Infectious Diseases, Beijing 302 Hospital, Beijing, China.

Abstract

This longitudinal study investigates the change of erythrocyte complement receptor (E-CR1) expression in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Circulating E-CR1 expression was semiquantified by flow cytometric analyses in 54 SARS patients and in 212 healthy individuals as a control. Since E-CR1 expression is influenced by the genetic polymorphisms in the CR1 gene, a major genetic polymorphism located within intron 27 of the CR1 gene was simultaneously analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The results showed that the expression level of E-CR1 (referred to as net fluorescence intensity values, NFI) was statistically correlated with the relevant genetic genotypes among the Chinese population including the healthy individuals (NFI: 5.14 +/- 0.82, 3.57 +/- 0.66 and 2.67 +/- 0.32 for HH, HL and LL genotypes, respectively) and SARS patients (NFI: 3.52 +/- 0.91 and 2.63 +/- 0.70 for HH and HL genotypes, respectively). Interestingly, the expression density of E-CR1 was found to fall significantly during the initiation and progressive phases (weeks 1 and 2 after the disease onset) and gradually returned close to normal through their whole convalescent phase (beginning from weeks 2 or 3 to weeks 7 or 8) in SARS patients irrespective CR1 genotype. In conclusion, our findings, at least, suggest that E-CR1 is likely involved in immune pathogenesis of SARS disease.

PMID:
15606620
PMCID:
PMC1809271
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2249.2005.02681.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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