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Ear Hear. 2004 Dec;25(6):611-23.

Artifactual responses when recording auditory steady-state responses.

Author information

1
School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this study was to investigate, in hearing-impaired participants who could not hear the stimuli, the possibility of artifactual auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) when stimuli are presented at high intensities.

DESIGN:

ASSRs to single (60 dB HL) and multiple (20 to 50 dB HL; 500 to 4000 Hz) bone-conduction stimuli as well as single 114 to 120 dB HL air-conduction stimuli, were obtained using the Rotman MASTER system, using analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion rates of 500, 1000, and 1250 Hz. Responses (p < 0.05) were considered artifactual when their numbers exceeded that expected by chance. In some conditions, we also obtained ASSRs to "alternated" stimuli (stimuli inverted and ASSRs to the two polarities averaged). A total of 17 subjects were tested.

RESULTS:

Bone conduction results: 500 Hz A/D rate: Large-amplitude (43 to 1558 nV) artifactual ASSRs were seen at 40 and 50 dB HL for the 500 Hz carrier frequency. Smaller responses (28 to 53 nV) were also recorded at 20 dB HL for the 500 Hz carrier frequency. Artifactual ASSRs (17 to 62 nV) were seen at 40 dB HL and above for the 1000 Hz carrier frequency and at 50 dB HL for the 2000 Hz carrier frequency. Alternating the stimulus polarity decreased the amplitude and occurrence of these artifactual responses but did not eliminate responses for the 500 Hz carrier frequency at 40 dB HL and above. No artifactual responses were recorded for 4000 Hz stimuli for any condition. 1000 Hz A/D rate: Artifactual ASSRs (15 to 523 nV) were seen at 50 dB HL and above for the 500 Hz carrier frequency and 40 dB HL and above for the 1000 Hz carrier frequency. Artifactual responses were also obtained at 50 dB HL for a 2000 Hz carrier frequency but not at lower levels. Artifactual responses were not seen for the 4000 Hz carrier frequency. Alternating the stimulus polarity removed the responses for the 1000 and 2000 Hz carrier frequencies but did not change the results for the 500 Hz carrier frequency. 1250 Hz A/D rate: Artifactual ASSRs (16 to 220 nV) were seen at 50 dB HL and above for the 500 Hz carrier frequency and 60 dB HL and above for the 1000 Hz carrier frequency. Alternating the stimulus polarity removed the responses for the 1000 Hz carrier frequency but did not change the results for the 500 Hz carrier frequency. There were no artifactual responses at 2000 and 4000 Hz. Air conduction results: 500 Hz A/D rate: Artifactual ASSRs (49 to 153 nV) were seen for 114 to 120 dB HL stimuli for 500 and 1000 Hz carrier frequencies. Alternating the stimulus polarity removed these responses. There were no artifactual responses at 2000 and 4000 Hz. 1000 and 1250 Hz A/D rates: Artifactual ASSRs (19 to 55 nV) were seen for a 120 dB HL stimulus for a 1000 Hz carrier. Alternating the stimulus polarity removed these responses.

CONCLUSIONS:

High-intensity air- or bone-conduction stimuli can produce spurious ASSRs, especially for 500 and 1000 Hz carrier frequencies. High-amplitude stimulus artifact can result in energy that is aliased to exactly the modulation frequency. Choice of signal conditioning (electroencephalogram filter slope and low-pass cutoff) and processing (A/D rate) can avoid spurious responses due to aliasing. However, artifactual responses due to other causes may still occur for bone-conduction stimuli 50 dB HL and higher (and possibly for high-level air conduction). Because the phases of these spurious responses do not invert with inversion of stimulus, the possibility of nonauditory physiologic responses cannot be ruled out. The clinical implications of these results are that artifactual responses may occur for any patient for bone-conduction stimuli at levels greater than 40 dB HL and for high-intensity air-conduction stimuli used to assess patients with profound hearing loss.

PMID:
15604921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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