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Biol Psychiatry. 2004 Dec 15;56(12):943-50.

Heat shock protein 12A shows reduced expression in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, E1655 BST, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. karoly+@pitt.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analyses of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area 9 from 10 matched pairs of schizophrenic and control subjects revealed a consistent and significant decrease (p = .001; mean log2 signal difference = -.58) in transcript expression for a gene clone KIAA0417. This database entry has been recently annotated as two highly homologous members of a heat-shock protein family (HSPA12A and HSPA12B).

METHODS:

We followed up our initial results by in situ hybridization in subjects with schizophrenia, major depression, and a chronic haloperidol-treated nonhuman primate model. Furthermore, we investigated the distribution of HSPA12A and HSPA12B transcripts across the human and nonhuman primate brain.

RESULTS:

We found that HSPA12A (but not HSPA12B) is highly expressed in the human brain and shows a neuron- and region-specific transcript distribution, with strongest expression in the frontal and occipital cortical regions. HSPA12A messenger ribonucleic acid was significantly reduced (p < .01; mean log2 optical density difference = -.84) across subjects with schizophrenia but not in the DLPFC of subjects with major depression or in monkeys chronically treated with haloperidol.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data are consistent with metabolic alterations in schizophrenia, reflected in selective changes in the expression of certain genes encoding proteins involved in cellular metabolism or metabolic responsiveness.

PMID:
15601604
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2004.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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