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Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2004 Dec;44(6):558-61.

Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis.

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1
National Women's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

AIMS:

To review the demographic characteristics, antecedents and outcome for early neonatal Escherichia coli sepsis. Secondary aims were to identify antenatal antibiotic use and to review the antimicrobial susceptibility.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review was performed for all infants with a positive culture for E. coli from either blood or CSF samples obtained between January 1998 and October 2002.

RESULTS:

Nineteen liveborn infants with early onset sepsis and one stillborn baby with a positive maternal blood culture for E. coli were identified. Pregnancy complications included multiple pregnancy in five (25%), preterm rupture of membranes 10 (50%) and maternal urinary tract infection in five (25%). Eighteen of the cases were born preterm and two at term. The mortality was 8/20 (40%), and for nine cases with developmental outcome data available, 67% were within normal limits and 33% were abnormal. Of the 20 E. coli isolates 11 (55%) were resistant to amoxycillin and 1 (5%) was resistant to gentamicin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Infants with early onset E. coli sepsis had a poor outcome with high mortality and a third of the survivors manifesting neurodevelopmental impairment. Although amoxycillin resistance is common, there is a low prevalence of gentamicin resistance in local isolates.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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