Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurosci. 2004 Dec 8;24(49):11057-69.

Sodium influx pathways during and after anoxia in rat hippocampal neurons.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3.

Abstract

Mechanisms that contribute to Na+ influx during and immediately after 5 min anoxia were investigated in cultured rat hippocampal neurons loaded with the Na+-sensitive fluorophore sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate. During anoxia, an influx of Na+ in the face of reduced Na+,K+-ATPase activity caused a rise in [Na+]i. After the return to normoxia, Na+,K+-ATPase activity mediated the recovery of [Na+]i despite continued Na+ entry. Sodium influx during and after anoxia occurred through multiple pathways and increased the longer neurons were maintained in culture. Under the experimental conditions used, Na+ entry during anoxia did not reflect the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, TTX- or lidocaine-sensitive Na+ channels, plasmalemmal Na+/Ca2+ exchange, Na+/H+ exchange, or HCO3--dependent mechanisms; rather, contributions were received from a Gd3+-sensitive pathway activated by reactive oxygen species and Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransport in neurons maintained for 6-10 and 11-14 d in vitro (DIV), respectively. Sodium entry immediately after anoxia was not attributable to the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, voltage-activated Na+ channels, or Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransport; rather, it occurred via Na+/Ca2+ exchange, Na+/H+ exchange, and a Gd3+-sensitive pathway similar to that observed during anoxia; 11-14 DIV neurons received an additional contribution from an -dependent mechanism(s). The results provide insight into the intrinsic mechanisms that contribute to disturbed internal Na+ homeostasis during and immediately after anoxia in rat hippocampal neurons and, in this way, may play a role in the pathogenesis of anoxic or ischemic cell injury.

PMID:
15590922
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2829-04.2004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center