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Respir Med. 2004 Dec;98(12):1207-13.

Gender differences in the management and experience of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Worldwide Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline, Greenford, UK. louise.x.watson@gsk.com

Abstract

Whether women receive the same medical care for COPD as men and if they are at risk of different outcomes as a result, is not known. The Confronting COPD International Survey was performed in the USA, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, The Netherlands, Spain and the UK in 2000 with 3265 COPD participants. Forty-one per cent were women; mean age in women and men was 61.2 (SD 10.5) and 64.4 (11.0) years, mean pack-years of smoking 36 (29) and 46 (35) years, respectively. After adjusting for age, pack-years, country and severe dyspnea (MRC scores 5 and 4), women were less likely to have had spirometry (OR 0.84, 95% C.I. 0.72-0.98) but more likely to get smoking cessation advice (OR 1.57, 1.33-1.86). Despite significantly lower pack-years of smoking, women were more likely to report severe dyspnea than men (OR 1.30, 1.10-1.54), with similar cough (OR 1.08, 0.92-1.27) and less sputum (OR 0.84, 0.72-0.98). There were no differences in the risk of hospitalisation or emergency room visit. This study indicates that gender differences in COPD care and outcomes exist.

PMID:
15588042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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