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Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1478-86.

Neuromedin beta: a strong candidate gene linking eating behaviors and susceptibility to obesity.

Author information

1
Division of Kinesiology, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lipid Research Centre, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity is frequently associated with eating disorders, and evidence indicates that both conditions are influenced by genetic factors. However, little is known about the genes influencing eating behaviors.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to identify genes associated with eating behaviors.

DESIGN:

Three eating behaviors were assessed in 660 adults from the Quebec Family Study with the use of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire. A genome-wide scan was conducted with a total of 471 genetic markers spanning the 22 autosomes to identify quantitative trait loci for eating behaviors. Body composition and macronutrient and energy intakes were also measured.

RESULTS:

Four quantitative trait loci were identified for disinhibition and susceptibility to hunger. Of these, the best evidence of linkage was found between a locus on chromosome 15q24-q25 and disinhibition (P <0.0058) and susceptibility to hunger (P <0.0001). After fine-mapping, the peak linkage was found between markers D15S206 and D15S201 surrounding the neuromedin beta (NMB) gene. A missense mutation (p.P73T) located within the NMB gene showed significant associations with eating behaviors and obesity phenotypes. The T73T homozygotes were 2 times as likely to exhibit high levels of disinhibition (odds ratio: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.89; P=0.03) and susceptibility to hunger (odds ratio: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.15, 3.06; P=0.01) as were the P73 allele carriers. Six-year follow-up data showed that the amount of body fat gain over time in T73T subjects was >2 times that than in P73P homozygotes (3.6 compared with 1.5 kg; P <0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest that NMB is a very strong candidate gene of eating behaviors and predisposition to obesity.

PMID:
15585758
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/80.6.1478
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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