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Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2005 Feb;25(1):149-67.

Food allergy and additives: triggers in asthma.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 34th Sreet and Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. spergel@email.chop.edu

Abstract

Exposure to food allergens can cause a varied pattern of respiratory symptoms, with allergic responses ranging from asthma symptoms to occupational asthma. Food allergy in a patient presenting as asthma tends to indicate a more severe disease constellation. Patients with underlying asthma experience more severe and life-threatening allergic food reactions. When a food reaction involves respiratory symptoms, it is almost always a more severe reaction compared with reactions that do not involve the respiratory tract. Susceptible patients may even react to a causative food on inhalation without ingestion. However, isolated asthma or rhinitis symptoms without concomitant cutaneous or gastrointestinal symptoms are rare events.

PMID:
15579369
DOI:
10.1016/j.iac.2004.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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