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Blood Rev. 2005 Jan;19(1):29-38.

Stem cell plasticity.

Author information

1
Stem Cell Institute, Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation Division, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Abstract

The central dogma in stem cell biology has been that cells isolated from a particular tissue can renew and differentiate into lineages of the tissue it resides in. Several studies have challenged this idea by demonstrating that tissue specific cell have considerable plasticity and can cross-lineage restriction boundary and give rise to cell types of other lineages. However, the lack of a clear definition for plasticity has led to confusion with several reports failing to demonstrate that a single cell can indeed differentiate into multiple lineages at significant levels. Further, differences between results obtained in different labs has cast doubt on some results and several studies still await independent confirmation. In this review, we critically evaluate studies that report stem cell plasticity using three rigid criteria to define stem cell plasticity; differentiation of a single cell into multiple cell lineages, functionality of differentiated cells in vitro and in vivo, robust and persistent engraft of transplanted cells.

PMID:
15572215
DOI:
10.1016/j.blre.2004.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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