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Laryngoscope. 2004 Dec;114(12):2172-5.

Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Lo Tung Poh-Ai Hospital, I-lan, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS:

It was the authors' premise that the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test may be used to differentiate acute low-tone hearing loss (ALHL) from Meniere's disease with low-tone HL.

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective study.

METHODS:

From January 2000 to December 2002, consecutive 12 patients with ALHL and another 12 patients with definite Meniere's disease with low-tone HL were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent audiometry and VEMP test, before and after treatment with isosorbide for 3 consecutive months.

RESULTS:

Before treatment, 12 patients with ALHL revealed normal VEMPs (11, 92%) and augmented VEMPs (1). After treatment, 11 (92%) patients had resolved to normal hearing within 3 days. One year later, two (17%) patients progressed to Meniere's disease. In comparison with Meniere's disease, 6 (50%) of 12 patients showed normal VEMPs before treatment, and 7 (58%) patients had their hearing improved 3 months after treatment. Comparison of VEMP responses or hearing outcome between both groups exhibited significant differences.

CONCLUSION:

Most patients with ALHL reveal normal VEMPs throughout the episode, indicating that the saccule is spared. In contrast, 50% of Meniere's disease patients with low-tone HL demonstrate abnormal VEMPs, showing a significant difference. Therefore, the VEMP test can be used to differentiate ALHL from Meniere's disease with low-tone HL.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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