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Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2004 Dec;135(4):306-12. Epub 2004 Nov 24.

Staphylococcal enterotoxin-B-mediated stimulation of interleukin-13 production as a potential aetiologic factor in eczema in infants.

Author information

1
Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, and Centre for Child Health Research, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been found in 80-100% of lesional skin from patients with atopic eczema dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) and is thought to have a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Furthermore, up to 65% of S. aureus from lesional skin has been shown to produce toxigenic superantigens.

METHODS:

Using a cohort of 11 children under 2 years of age diagnosed with AEDS, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, cultured them with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) and phytohaemagglutinin, and assessed the cytokine response profiles. Plasma was also collected for immunoglobulin E analysis. In addition, skin and nasal swabs were taken and cultured to determine the presence of SEB-producing S. aureus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse passive latex agglutination.

RESULTS:

We found a significant increase in the production of the SEB-induced cytokines interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 in the patient group when compared with non-atopic, healthy controls. For IL-13, there was almost no overlap in the levels between the groups. However, there was no correlation between SEB-induced IL-13 and disease severity. This difference was not seen when heat-inactivated S. aureus was used to stimulate the cells.

CONCLUSIONS:

IL-13 is an important factor in AEDS development in early childhood, and prophylactic anti-staphylococcal treatment may provide protection from AEDS in atopic individuals.

PMID:
15564771
DOI:
10.1159/000082324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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