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Br J Sports Med. 2004 Dec;38(6):704-8.

Abnormally high serum ferritin levels among professional road cyclists.

Author information

  • 1Laboratoire Suisse d'Analyse du Dopage, Institut Universitaire de Médecine Légale, Lausanne, Switzerland. hzotter@hospvd.ch <hzotter@hospvd.ch>

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An international, longitudinal medical follow up examination of male professional road cyclists revealed excessively elevated serum ferritin levels.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the importance of elevated ferritin values among professional cyclists, their relationship with age and nationality, and their evolution over 3 years.

METHODS:

Over 1000 serum ferritin values were collected. Other parameters were included in order to exclude conditions which might have increased ferritin levels without changing body iron stores.

RESULTS:

In 1999, over 45% of riders displayed ferritin values above 300 ng/ml and one fourth levels over 500 ng/ml. These percentages had decreased to 27% and 9%, respectively, 3 years later, while the overall average, which was above the normal limits in 1999, had decreased by 33% in 3 years. Older cyclists had higher ferritin values than younger cyclists. There was also a relationship between ferritin levels and the nationality of the cyclists. Analysis of 714 riders in 2000 and 2002 showed only a slight and insignificant decrease in the mean ferritin value although those with initially elevated iron stores had a much greater decrease.

CONCLUSION:

Professional road cyclists used excessive iron supplementation leading to high serum ferritin levels correlating with increased body iron stores. Although the situation progressively improved over 3 years, it remains worrying as increased body iron stores are related to health complications. Therefore, prevention in addition to the fight against doping should be a main goal of the UCI. Aggressive therapy for athletes with excessive ferritin values should be carried out at or before the end of their careers.

PMID:
15562163
PMCID:
PMC1724983
DOI:
10.1136/bjsm.2003.006635
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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