Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 1;160(11):1033-8.

Differential distribution of allelic variants in cytokine genes among African Americans and White Americans.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. repro@edc.pitt.edu

Abstract

Racial disparities in health are largely unexplained. Because many diseases causing premature mortality among African Americans are mediated by the immune system, the authors explored the race-specific distribution of allelic variants in cytokine genes known to stimulate inflammation. The authors studied women seeking prenatal care and delivering singletons in uncomplicated first births at a US hospital in 1997-2001. A total of 179 African-American women and 396 White women were evaluated for functionally relevant allelic variants in cytokine genes. African-American women were significantly more likely to carry allelic variants known to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines; odds ratios increased with allele dose. Odds ratios for African Americans versus Whites in genotypes up-regulating proinflammatory interleukin (IL) 1 (IL1A-4845G/G, IL1A-889T/T, IL1B-3957C/C, and IL1B-511A/A) ranged from 2.1 to 4.9. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 IL6-174 G/G genotype was 36.5 times (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.8, 151.9) more common among African Americans. Genotypes known to down-regulate the antiinflammatory interleukin-10 (IL10-819 T/T and IL10-1082 A/A) were elevated 3.5-fold (95% CI: 1.8, 6.6) and 2.8-fold (95% CI: 1.6, 4.9) in African Americans. Cytokine genotypes found to be more common in African-American women were consistently those that up-regulate inflammation.

PMID:
15561982
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwh325
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center