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Arch Dis Child. 2004 Dec;89(12):1111-6.

Bed-sharing and the infant's thermal environment in the home setting.

Author information

1
Department of Women's & Children's Health, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. barbara.galland@stonebow.otago.ac.nz

Abstract

AIMS:

To study bed-sharing and cot-sleeping infants in the natural setting of their own home in order to identify differences in the thermal characteristics of the two sleep situations and their potential hazards.

METHODS:

Forty routine bed-sharing infants and 40 routine cot-sleeping infants aged 5-27 weeks were individually matched between groups for age and season. Overnight video and physiological data of bed-share infants and cot-sleeping infants were recorded in the infants' own homes including rectal, shin, and ambient temperature.

RESULTS:

The mean rectal temperature two hours after sleep onset for bed-share infants was 36.79 degrees C and for cot-sleeping infants, 36.75 degrees C (difference 0.05 degrees C, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.14). The rate of change thereafter was higher in the bed-share group than in the cot group (0.04 degrees C v 0.03 degrees C/h, difference 0.01, 0.00 to 0.02). Bed-share infants had a higher shin temperature at two hours (35.43 v 34.60 degrees C, difference 0.83, 0.18 to 1.49) and a higher rate of change (0.04 v -0.10 degrees C/h, difference 0.13, 0.08 to 0.19). Bed-sharing infants had more bedding. Face covering events were more common and bed-share infants woke and fed more frequently than cot infants (mean wake times/night: 4.6 v 2.5).

CONCLUSIONS:

Bed-share infants experience warmer thermal conditions than those of cot-sleeping infants, but are able to maintain adequate thermoregulation to maintain a normal core temperature.

PMID:
15557043
PMCID:
PMC1719737
DOI:
10.1136/adc.2003.048082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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