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Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2005 Feb-Apr;87(2-3):247-53.

Rapporteur report: cellular, animal and epidemiological studies of the effects of static magnetic fields relevant to human health.

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1
BioNIR Research Group at the Radiobiology Laboratory, STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Laippatie 4, FIN-00880, Helsinki, Finland. dariusz.leszcynski@stuk.fi

Abstract

Three talks were presented in the session on "Cellular, Animal and Epidemiological Studies of the Effects of Static Magnetic Fields Relevant to Human Health". The first talk presented the in vitro effects of static magnetic fields on cell cultures. The second talk presented the in vivo evidence obtained from animal studies. The final, third talk, presented the evidence obtained from epidemiological studies. The overall conclusion of the three presentations and the following general discussion was that the scientific evidence available to date is weak and contains large gaps in knowledge either due to the poor quality of published studies or because of the lack of published research on certain health-related topics. It was emphasized that the rapid development of new technological applications of static magnetic fields (e.g. magnetic levitation trains or magnetic resonance imaging-MRI) results in the human population at large, in certain occupations, and in a selected population of clinical patients being exposed to ever increasing static magnetic field strengths. It is of concern that the knowledge presently available concerning the health effects of these strong static magnetic fields is lagging a long way behind technological development. In conclusion, it was suggested that there is an urgent need to perform new studies in all research areas (in vitro, in vivo and epidemiology) in order to fill the present gaps in knowledge and provide assurance that this technology will not cause any unwanted and unexpected health side effects.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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