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J Hist Neurosci. 2004 Dec;13(4):336-44.

Illnesses of the brain in John Quincy Adams.

Author information

1
Neurology Department, The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH, USA. Paulson.2@osu.edu

Abstract

John Quincy Adams, the sixth and perhaps most scholarly American president, served courageously despite familial essential tremor, depression, and cerebrovascular disease. His cousin Samuel Adams and his father John Adams also had essential tremor, which the later called "quiveration". Alcoholism and depression affected several members of J.Q. Adams's family. Following his own time as president, J.Q. Adams returned to duty as the congressman who most assiduously fought slavery, a fight he continued even after he had suffered a major left hemispheric stroke. His fatal collapse in Congress, protesting the Mexican War, is legendary among the final illnesses of American statesmen.

PMID:
15545105
DOI:
10.1080/09647040490881686
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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