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Eur J Radiol. 2004 Dec;52(3):283-7.

Ethanol sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Interventional Radiology Sectionm Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, 52621, Israel. rimonu@sheba.health.gov.il

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Venous malformations are congenital lesions that can cause pain, decreased range of movement, compression on adjacent structures, bleeding, consumptive coagulopathy and cosmetic deformity. Sclerotherapy alone or combined with surgical excision is the accepted treatment in symptomatic malformations after failed treatment attempts with tailored compression garments.

OBJECTIVES:

To report our experience with percutaneous sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations with ethanol 96%.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

41 sclerotherapy sessions were performed on 21 patients, aged 4-46 years, 15 females and 6 males. Fourteen patients were treated for painful extremity lesions, while five others with face and neck lesions and two with giant chest malformations had treatment for esthetic reasons. All patients had a pre-procedure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In all patients, 96% ethanol was used as the sclerosant by direct injection using general anesthesia. A minimum of 1-year clinical follow-up was performed. Follow-up imaging studies were performed if clinically indicated.

RESULTS:

17 patients showed complete or partial symptomatic improvement after one to nine therapeutic sessions. Four patients with lower extremity lesions continue to suffer from pain and they are considered as a treatment failure. Complications were encountered in five patients, including acute pulmonary hypertension with cardiovascular collapse, pulmonary embolus, skin ulcers (two) and skin blisters. All patients fully recovered.

CONCLUSION:

Sclerotherapy with 96% ethanol for venous malformations was found to be effective for symptomatic improvement, but serious complications can occur.

PMID:
15544907
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejrad.2003.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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