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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2004 Jul-Aug;36(4):197-203.

Cooking classes outperform cooking demonstrations for college sophomores.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if cooking classes improve subjects' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward cooking.

DESIGN:

Comparison of outcomes of 2 treatment groups (demonstration vs hands-on cooking classes) using pre- and posttests.

SETTING:

University cooking laboratories.

PARTICIPANTS:

First-semester sophomores (n = 65) who were 25% male with a mean age of 19.7 years.

INTERVENTION:

The intervention group (n = 33) attended 4 2-hour cooking classes, based on Social Learning Theory, and a supermarket tour. The demonstration group (n = 32) attended a cooking demonstration. Subjects completed 6 surveys.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Changes in attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors regarding cooking.

ANALYSIS:

Descriptive statistics were used to compare demographic variables. Analysis of covariance and chi-square analyses were used to compare outcome variables.

RESULTS:

Analysis revealed no gender differences. Participants displayed positive shifts on attitude scales. The intervention group had a pattern of larger positive shifts (0.4-0.7 vs 0.1-0.5 gain), some of which were statistically significant. Participants displayed positive, but not statistically significant, shifts in knowledge and some behaviors.

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:

The intervention group experienced more statistically significant gains in attitudes and appeared to have a better pattern of gains in cooking-related knowledge and behaviors. Given limited resources, demonstration cooking classes could reach larger audiences in varied settings, but the impact would likely be weaker than that of cooking classes.

PMID:
15544728
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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